Facebook Stocks Plunge to a New Low as IPO Lock-up Ends

Shares of the social networking site, Facebook saw a drop of nearly six percent from the day’s opening Thursday as the firm unlocked 271 million shares for trading. The stocks plunged to a new low and dipped below the $20 mark for the first time- nearly 50 percent of its Initial Price Offering (IPO) of $38.

Some analysts believe this trading to be a sign that investors and company’s insiders wanted to get rid of their investments on Facebook. The company seems to have lost its shine and has had a rough time since going public. The social networking site has left many investors anxious about whether the company would be a passing fancy or will recover as it earns revenue from advertising via mobile networks. However, the firm did meet expectations in its first public earnings report.

Facebook is reported to go down on 36 trading days, up on 25 and unchanged on one since going public.

A challenge has been set for Facebook to mon­etize its free service on a smartphone or tablet-sized screen, that too without annoying any of its users. Advertising through mobile phones also comes as a little hope, which can help the firm sail through smoothly.

Facebook is now attempting to make its mark and get stable as the firm recently started to test ads on the mobile devices and computers of users who haven’t liked the products being advertised. The social network labeled these ads as “sponsored”.

Despite the sharp drop in Facebook’s market value price in the last three months, early investors and analysts are still hoping for a boon by selling at the current price. Analysts are also positive that in the long run, Facebook will rise with its plans of advertising via mobile devices, settling all dark clouds. It has been a rough run for Facebook, but various analysts hold positive long-term views for the social network.

The Wall Street Journal also reported that employees who received Facebook shares as compensation will be able to sell their shares only by the end of the year.… Read the rest

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