The world’s powerhouse of innovation, Japan has broken internet speed test records by passing 319 TBPS in ultra-bandwidth. The fastest data transfer was achieved for a distance of 3000 kilometres without any lags in the performance. 

The engineers of Japan’s National Institute of Information and Communication Technology (NICT) have surpassed the old internet speed record and have set a new record of 319 terabits per second (Tb/s) over a distance of 3,000 kilometres. At this speed, one can comfortably download over 7,000 high-definition movies in just about a second.

The country’s growing reputation as a powerhouse has made it one of the world’s biggest consumer markets. To meet the changing demands of the consumers, the engineers at NICT have been working religiously on developing new technologies that will hold the power to potentially double internet speeds.

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The team successfully carried and transmitted data across a distance of 3000 kilometres without noting or recording any dip in the performance. It involved taking into account every part of the pipeline and upgrading the fibre optic line with four cores over the usual single core in typical lines. They also amplified the laser at its source.

The old record for the fastest data transfer was held at 178 Tb/s. The new technology knocks the old internet speeds by using 4-core optical fibre of standard outer diameter of 0.125 mm to transfer data using light instead of normal copper cables. The team achieved the fastest data transfers ever using specialised optical fibre cables. It now claims that the technology can be implemented on the existing fibre optics. The engineers believe that, with regular optical fibre lines, the new technology will help accommodate the improved internet speed. 

Since high internet speed is the need of the hour owing to remote working, the record-breaking internet speed test would help build new communication systems that will help support the new bandwidth-hungry services.

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