Bruce Willis Reads iTunes Terms of Service Agreement, May Take Apple To Court!

In an intriguing move, Bruce Willis, star of The Sixth Sense and Die Hard series is planning to take a legal action against the revolutionary Apple Inc.

It seems that most of us pass on to next level when it comes to reading on the terms and conditions of the Apple iTunes store. But that just excluded action hero, Bruce Willis who wants to sue Apple over the terms and conditions of its iTunes library.

The Hollywood star, it seems, is not happy over the fact that Apple won’t legally transfer his huge collection of digital music on iTunes to his daughters upon his death.

Willis has a huge collection of music on iTunes, which as per Apple’s conditions can only be borrowed by customers rather than owing them outright. The music, Apple says is under a nontransferable license and users buy the right to listen to that music instead of buying it altogether.

It means when Bruce Willis dies, so will his music library, which he so wants to pass on to his daughters- Rumer, Scout, and Tallulah.

This issue comes as a surprise to users who just realized that most of the iBooks and music they downloaded from iTunes or App Store do not actually belong to them. And it is something that various major music labels struggled with for years. Digital music being passed on to others was something that concerned music labels for long as it would have hurt sales of music.

But Apple’s deal with music labels for its iTunes Match cloud service took care of this, which charges users $25 per year for access into the entire music library in spite of the songs being bought on iTunes. According to the number of songs that come in a user’s library, Music Labels get a commission.

This issue has definitely raised a concern. In case Willis plans to take Apple to the court, we believe and really hope the firm would address his concern politely.  Willis, being a big star, doesn’t really care about money. But this issue will surely affect thousands of other consumers, who till now believed they owned their music library. At least I thought I owned my tunes, too, until now!

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