Japanese Court Rules Out Apple’s Claims on Samsung!

The most famous Apple vs. Samsung is one court case, which is being fought all over the world. In one of the latest ruling, a Japanese court recently rejected Apple’s patent infringement claim against Samsung, which Apple accused of violating its iPhone technology in its smartphones.

Waging a battle over intellectual property, this ruling comes as a blow to Apple, which recently won more than $1 billion in damages in the US.

The South Korean tech giant, however, got a jump, when the Tokyo district court ruled and said that Samsung did not infringe patents with its technology for synchronizing music and video between computers and smartphones or tablets.

Apple vs. Samsung battle is going on in at least nine countries and four continents over violating each other’s patents.

Samsung shares saw a rise Friday following this verdict, which came as a relief to the firm, which recently suffered a loss of around $12 billion because of the legal battle.

This patent suit was filed in the Tokyo court one year ago by Apple, which claimed Samsung of infringing its iPhone technology in its smartphones and tablets such as the Galaxy S, the Galaxy S2, and the Galaxy tab.

As per the International Data Group, a study revealed that Samsung and Apple together account for nearly half of the productive global smartphone market. Samsung holds 32.6 percent of the smartphone market, up from 17 percent a year ago, whereas Apple’s share is at 16.9 percent, down from 18.8 percent one year ago.

Samsung is fighting not only with Apple but also domestic companies such as Sharp, Fujitsu and Sony in Tokyo.

The Korean company’s firm fate will be determined on Dec. 6th as that is the date set for the hearing of Apple’s plea to pull down eight of Samsung’s smartphones in the US market.

In yet another ruling in Samsung vs. Apple case, a Seoul-based court recently ruled that the two tech makers did infringe on one another’s various patents. The patent-infringing devices from both the giants were banned in the South Korea market.

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